When should you consider psychotherapy?

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Because of the many misconceptions about psychotherapy, you may be reluctant to seek help. It may be stigma, your own judgment, or you may feel nervous about trying it. Overcoming these blocks may be worth it because any time your quality of life isn’t what you want it to be, psychotherapy can help.

Some people seek psychotherapy because they have felt depressed, anxious, or angry for a long time. Others may want help for a chronic illness that is interfering with their emotional or physical well-being. Still, most people have short-term problems they need help navigating. They may be going through a divorce, having relationship concerns, feeling overwhelmed by a new job or grieving a family member's death.

You may benefit from therapy if you have any of the following concerns:

  • You feel an overwhelming, prolonged sense of helplessness and sadness.

  • Your problems don't seem to get better despite your efforts and help from family and friends.

  • You find it difficult to concentrate on work assignments or to carry out other everyday activities.

  • You worry excessively, expect the worst and are constantly on edge.

  • Your actions, such as drinking too much alcohol, using drugs or being aggressive, are harming you or others.

  • You have thoughts of hurting yourself or someone else.

The treatment you receive will depend on a variety of factors: current psychological research, your psychologist's theoretical orientation and what works best for your situation. 

The most important factor to consider is whether your psychologist has the expertise  when it comes to your specific needs and whether your psychologist feels he or she can help you. It is important you find someone not only you feel comfortable with but are able to get the help you need.